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Awards and Commendations

Medals, ribbons, citations and badges issued and awarded by the 25th Infantry Division to soldiers for excellence.


National Defense Service Medal
History
Like our real-life defenders, the NDSM adorns the chest of warriors throughout our great sovereignty, and abroad. To obtain this ribbon here in the 25th, one must simply complete BCT, and enter under arms during a time of conflict(Vietnam).
Prerequisites
Graduation of BCT.
Army Good Conduct Medal
History
The AGCM(Army Good Conduct Medal) typically adorns individuals who possess no disciplinary infractions or transgression-to-standards for a period no less than one(1) month. This may be awarded by a Platoon-Grade Officer.
Prerequisites
1 Month without any disciplinary infractions
Humanitarian Service Medal, HSM
History
The Humanitarian Service Medal was established by President Ford per Executive Order 11965, dated 19 January 1977. The order provided for award for participation in a military operation of a humanitarian nature subsequent to 1 April 1975. The policy and award criteria for the Humanitarian Service Medal was established by Department of Defense Directive 1348.25, dated 23 June 1977. Proposed medals were submitted to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) for approval 18 April 1977 and the selected design was approved by OSD on 10 May 1977. The design by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry, uses the outstretched hand with palm up as the international symbol for aid and assistance. On the reverse, the oak sprig is symbolic of strength imparted through a selfless mission to aid mankind. The color purple in the ribbon stands for self-sacrifice, white for regeneration and blue for universal friendship. In addition, the two shades of blue are the colors used in the flags of OSD.( It is also the only modern Medal 25thID is awarding. )
Prerequisites
The Humanitarian Service Medal shall be awarded to members of the 25th Infantry Division who distinguish themselves by meritorious direct participation in any significant online act or operation of a humanitarian nature approved by Command Staff. The medal is awarded for participation in areas of helping others with technical issues (such as web design, graphics, signatures and general computer problems) or morale support to fellow soldiers in times of need.
Army Achievement Medal
History
The Army Achievement Medal is granted to personnel for outstanding achievement or meritorious service not of a nature that merits the Commendation Medal.
Prerequisites
Meritorious service or achievement in either combat or noncombat situations based on sustained performance or specific achievement of a superlative nature but which does not warrant a Commendation Medal or higher.
Joint Service Commendation Medal
History
This ribbon is reserved for individuals whose actions and/or effective performance during an official event becomes noted in a positive manner by supporting units, unit auxiliaries, and/or joint-forces.
Prerequisites
Individuals whose actions and/or effective performance during an official event becomes noted in a positive manner by supporting units, unit auxiliaries, and/or joint-forces.
Unit Service Medal
History
The USM(Unit Service Medal) is typically reserved for those whom display lengthy, contributing service for an extended duration of time. Unit Service Medals are given primarily in instances meriting high recognition for actions pertinent to the unit's future.
Prerequisites
Reserved for those whom display lengthy, contributing service for an extended duration of time. ( 3 Months )
Purple Heart, PH
History
The original Purple Heart, designated as the Badge of Military Merit, was established by General George Washington by order from his headquarters at Newburgh, New York, August 7, 1782. The writings of General Washington quoted in part: "The General ever desirous to cherish a virtuous ambition in his soldiers, as well as to foster and encourage every species of Military Merit, directs that whenever any singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be permitted to wear on his facings over the left breast, the figure of a heart in purple cloth or silk, edged with narrow lace or binding. Not only instances of unusual gallantry, but also of extraordinary fidelity and essential service in any way shall meet with a due reward". So far as the known surviving records show, this honor badge was granted to only three men, all of them noncommissioned officers: Sergeant Daniel Bissell of the 2d Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line; Sergeant William Brown of the 5th Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line, and Sergeant Elijah Churchill of the 2d Continental Dragoons, which was also a Connecticut Regiment. The original Purple Heart depicted on the first page is a copy of the badge awarded to Sergeant Elijah Churchill and is now owned by the New Windsor Cantonment, National Temple Hill Association, PO Box 525, Vails Gate, NY 12584. The only other known original badge is the badge awarded to Sergeant William Brown and is in the possession of The Society of the Cincinnati, New Hampshire Branch but differs in design by not having any lettering embroidered on the heart and the leaves are at the top only with a larger spray of leaves at the base. Subsequent to the Revolution, the Order of the Purple Heart had fallen into disuse and no further awards were made. By Order of the President of the United States, the Purple Heart was revived on the 200th Anniversary of George Washington's birth, out of respect to his memory and military achievements, by War Department General Orders No. 3, dated 22 February 1932. The criteria was announced in War Department Circular dated 22 February 1932 and authorized award to soldiers, upon their request, who had been awarded the Meritorious Service Citation Certificate or were authorized to wear wound chevrons subsequent to 5 April 1917. During the early period of World War II (7 Dec 41 to 22 Sep 43), the Purple Heart was awarded both for wounds received in action against the enemy and for meritorious performance of duty. With the establishment of the Legion of Merit, by an Act of Congress, the practice of awarding the Purple Heart for meritorious service was discontinued. By Executive Order 9277, dated 3 December 1942, the decoration was extended to be applicable to all services and the order required that regulations of the Services be uniform in application as far as practicable. This executive order also authorized award only for wounds received. Executive Order 10409, dated 12 February 1952, revised authorizations to include the Service Secretaries subject to approval of the Secretary of Defense. Executive Order 11016, dated 25 April 1962, included provisions for posthumous award of the Purple Heart. Executive Order 12464, dated 23 February 1984, authorized award of the Purple Heart as a result of terrorist attacks or while serving as part of a peacekeeping force subsequent to 28 March 1973. The Senate approved an amendment to the 1985 Defense Authorization Bill on 13 June 1985, which changed the precedent from immediately above the Good Conduct Medal to immediately above the Meritorious Service Medals. Public Law 99-145 authorized the award for wounds received as a result of "friendly fire". Public Law 104-106 expanded the eligibility date, authorizing award of the Purple Heart to a former prisoner of war who was wounded before 25 April 1962. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year1998 (Public Law 105-85) changed the criteria to delete authorization for award of the Purple Heart Medal to any civilian national of the United States while serving under competent authority in any capacity with the Armed Forces. This change was effective 18 May 1998.
Prerequisites
The Purple Heart is awarded to soldiers who, while engaged in an official combat operation are bravely wounded and incapacitated in combat. Taken by friendly forces to the nearest Medical facilities and been recovered there to go out to the AO again. (This Medal needs to be recommended by a 68W.)
Meritorious Service Medal, MSM
History
At Tri-Department Awards Conference, 5-6 February 1968, there was a discussion on the need for a third meritorious award to provide appropriate recognition for noncombat achievement or service comparable to the Bronze Star Medal for combat achievement or service. It was felt that the Legion of Meritas prestige was slipping because it was being used with increasing frequency to reward service below Legion of Merit standard, but higher than that required for the Commendation Medal. A proposed executive order was prepared in April 1968 and forwarded for approval to the Military Departments. An ad hoc committee was formed by the Secretary of Defense (M&RA) to select a name. On 8 November 1968, the committee unanimously approved the name "Meritorious Service Medal". President Johnson established the Meritorious Service Medal per Executive Order No. 11448 dated 16 January 1969.
The decoration was designed by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry, and the design was approved by the committee on 20 March 1969. The ribbon design purposely follows the colors used for the Legion of Merit to reflect the parallel between the two medals. The eagle, symbol of the nation, stands on laurel branches denoting achievement. The star is used to represent the military service and the rays emanating therefrom denote the constant efforts of individuals to achieve through excellent and meritorious service.
Prerequisites
The Meritorious Service Medal shall be awarded to officers or senior NCOs who distinguished themselves by outstanding non-combat meritorious achievement or service below that required for the Defense Superior Service Medal. Award of this medal indicates the awardee has performed in a position of significant responsibility over a sustained period of time, usually in a position of combat leadership.
Army Commendation Medal, ACM
History
In a summary sheet, 5 November 1945, WDGAP, Personnel Division recommended that an Army Commendation Ribbon of distinctive design be established to recognize meritorious service in an area at a time for which the Bronze Star Medal may not be awarded. The recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War and the ribbon was established by War Department Circular 377, dated 18 December 1945. This circular authorized award to "members of the Armed Forces of the United States serving in any capacity with the Army for meritorious service rendered since 7 December 1941, not in sustained operational activities against an enemy nor in direct support of such operation, i.e., in areas and at times when the Bronze Star Medal may not be awarded because of its operational character". Authority to award the Commendation Ribbon was delegated to Major Generals or commanders of any command, force or installation normally commanded by Major Generals.
Prerequisites
The Army Commendation Medal shall be awarded to soldiers for outstanding performance or achievement in a combat leadership role below that required for the Meritorious Service Medal. Can be awarded for achievement in action in a competitive match below that required for a Bronze Star. In case of a combat award, the V device shall be attached.
Bronze Star, BS
History
General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Roosevelt dated February 3, 1944, wrote: "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal have had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships." The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmens morale. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944. The Executive Order was amended by President Kennedy, per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962, to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces. As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshalls support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.
Prerequisites
The Bronze Star Medal may be awarded for meritorious achievement or meritorious service according to the following: *
Silver Star, SS
History
The Citation Star was established as a result of an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918 (65th Congress, Sess II, Chapter 143, page 873) and was promulgated in War Department Bulletin No. 43 dated 1918. It was retroactive to include those cited for gallantry in action in previous campaigns back to the Spanish-American War. Per letter from General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, dated February 26, 1926, is quoted in part: The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: "No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations." Army Regulation 600-40, paragraph 48, September 27, 1921, specified that the Citation Star would be worn above the clasp, on the ribbon of the service medal for the campaign for service in which the citations were given. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star medal to replace the Citation Star. This design placed the Citation Star on a bronze pendant suspended from the ribbon design. The star was no longer attached to a service or campaign ribbon. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the Army on December 15, 1942. The primary reason for congressional authorization was the desire to award the medal to civilians as well as the Army. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3746.
Prerequisites
Actions that merit the Silver Star must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the meet Medal of Honor or a Service Cross (Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, or the Air Force Cross).
Defense Distinguished Service Medal, DDSM
History
The Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM) shall only be awarded to officers of the Armed Forces of the United States whose exceptional performance of duty and contributions to national security or defense have been at the highest levels. Such officers have direct and ultimate responsibility for a major activity or program that significantly influences the policies of the U.S. Government. Only under the most unusual circumstances will the DDSM be awarded as an impact award for outstanding TDY achievement. The DDSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally distinguished service and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period.
Prerequisites
The Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM) shall be awarded only to officers who have rendered distinguished meritorious service in a position of enormous responsibility. The DDSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally distinguished service, and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period.
Distinguished Service Cross, DSC
History
The Distinguished Service Cross was established by President Woodrow Wilson on January 2, 1918. General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Forces in France, had recommended that recognition other than the Medal of Honor, be authorized for the Armed Forces of the United States for service rendered, in like manner, to that awarded by the European Armies. The request for establishment of the medal was forwarded from the Secretary of War to the President in a letter dated December 28, 1917. The Act of Congress establishing this award (193-65th Congress) dated July 9, 1918 is contained in Title 10 United States Code (USC) 3742. The establishment of the Distinguished Service Cross was promulgated in War Department General Order No. 6, dated January 12, 1918.
Prerequisites
The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army and previously, the United States Army Air Forces. It is awarded for extraordinary heroism.
Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Air Force Cross (Air Force).
Medal of Honor, MOH
History
General George Washington had created the Badge of Military Merit on 7 August 1792 but it had fallen into disuse after the Revolutionary War. Decorations, as such, were still too closely related to European royalty to be of concern to the American people. However, the fierce fighting and deeds of valor during the Civil War brought into focus the realization that such valor must be recognized. Legislation was introduced in the Senate on 17 February 1862, which authorized the medal for the Army and followed the pattern of a similar award approved for Naval personnel in December 1861. The Resolution provided that: "The President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to cause two thousand "medals of honor" to be prepared with suitable emblematic devices, and to direct that the same be presented, in the name of Congress, to such noncommissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities during the present insurrection, and the sum of ten thousand dollars be, and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of carrying this resolution into effect." The Medal of Honor has had many designs throughout American history. On 23 April 1904, Congress authorized a new design of the medal. The design adopted at that time was designed by Major General George L. Gillespie and is the one currently in use. The medal was worn either suspended from the neck or pinned over the left breast in precedence to other military decorations.
Prerequisites
The Medal of Honor will only be awarded in the 25th Infantry Division to honor an overwhelming personal sacrifice of a member in a real life situation.